Nikki Haley: ‘Unthinkable’ that union bosses put themselves before student welfare

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Former US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley disagrees with teachers’ unions’ decisions to close schools after winter vacation due to a rise in cases of COVID-19.

“It’s unthinkable for unions to dictate the future of our children,” the former South Carolina governor told Fox News Digital. “We have a whole COVID generation who will struggle to graduate from high school because the union bosses are concerned about the welfare of our students. As parents, we have one job – the success of our children. It’s time to take on the teachers’ unions and fight back.”

His comments come after the Chicago Teachers Union voted to return to remote learning against school district orders until COVID-19 cases “significantly abate” or until reaching an agreement with the district regarding security protocols.

Former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley visits the Fox News Channel studios on November 12, 2019 in New York City. (John Lamparski/Getty Images)

Chicago Public Schools, the nation’s third-largest school district, said Tuesday it would cancel classes on Wednesday if the union holds the vote, so students will not only return to distant classrooms, but they’ve also missed a full day of school Wednesday as district chiefs and union leaders negotiate.

US SCHOOLS CLOSING AGAIN AS CHILD MENTAL HEALTH DECLARED A NATIONAL CRISIS

School systems in Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland and other states have delayed reopening after winter break, citing related concerns to COVID-19 and related staffing shortages. More than 3,200 schools are closed this week, according to a public school opening tracker from the Community Event website. burbio.

President Biden’s US bailout provides COVID-19 relief package assigned $122 billion to help K-12 public schools deal with the coronavirus pandemic, but despite the massive increase in funding, teachers’ union members remain concerned about the lack of COVID-19 testing and equipment personal protective equipment, as well as obsolete ventilation systems.

President Joe Biden visits East End Elementary School in North Plainfield, New Jersey, to promote his Build Back Better program on Oct. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Joe Biden visits East End Elementary School in North Plainfield, New Jersey, to promote his Build Back Better program on Oct. 25, 2021. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In a speech on Tuesday, Biden said it was safe for children to go to school in person, citing US bailout funding.

TEACHERS’ UNIONS ACROSS THE COUNTRY CITE COVID RISE TO DEMAND STOP IN-PERSON LEARNING

“We know our kids can be safe when they’re in school, by the way. That’s why I think schools should stay open. You know, they’ve got what they need thanks to the plan. bailout or the first month we were in office or the second month I signed on in March We provided states with $130 billion, including $1 billion to specifically keep our students safe and the opening of schools.

While cases have increased, deaths from the disease have more than halved. January 13, 2021, saw the highest number of COVID-related deaths since the start of the pandemic with nearly 4,050 deaths reported that day. The seven-day average hovered around 3,400 deaths per day. But as of Dec. 29, the last time the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its trend data, the national average was reported at just under 1,100 deaths per day.

Children wearing face masks at school during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Children wearing face masks at school during the COVID-19 pandemic.
(Allison/Bloomberg dinner via Getty Images)

The delays come as U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, along with the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Association of Children’s Hospitals, said a “national emergency” Where “crisisin child and adolescent mental health in the United States

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ED visits for attempted suicide among teenage girls, in particular, increased by 51% during the pandemic and ED visits among teens increased by 4% over the same period.

A January 2021 report by CDC researchers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) noted that as schools reopen for in-person instruction, “school-related cases of COVID-19 have been reported, but there is little evidence that schools have contributed significantly to increased community transmission.”


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